Creator Record

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Name Whistler, James McNeill
Other names Whistler, James Abbott McNeill
Whistler, James Abbott MacNeil
Life Dates 1834-1903
Born: Lowell, Massachusetts, United States
Died: London, England, United Kingdom

Nationality American
Geographic location(s) active in England and France
Occupation painter
printmaker
Notes American painter, printmaker, and designer, active in England. He developed from the Realism of Courbet and Manet to become one of the leading members of The Aesthetic Movement and an exponent of Japonisme. He adopted non-specific or musical titles for his works the emphasis of which was often mood or the manipulation of paint across the surface, rather than the actual subject depicted. He is best know for his work "Arrangement in Grey and Black No 1: Portrait of the Artist's Mother" (1871), and his subsequent portraits using simple tonal colors. In 1877, his work "Nocture in Black and Gold: the Falling Rocket," caused a sensation for its blatant abstract qualitites that shocked art critics. In his later life, he created an ambitious series of etchings. American painter.
Role Artist

Associated Records

Image of Art-2D Collection - 1957.3.158

Art-2D Collection - 1957.3.158

"Billingsgate," c. 1880, etching by James McNeill Whistler. Though "Billingsgate" was dated "1859" by Whistler on the copper plate, multiple impressions were made, and this is possibly an impression of the final state in 1882. It is a view of Billingsgate fish market on the north bank of the Thames River in London. Britain's largest inland fish-market was held here, at the north end of London Bridge. The market closed in 1982

Image of Art-2D Collection - 1962.20.32

Art-2D Collection - 1962.20.32

"Whistler with the White Lock," 1876-1879, etching by James McNeill Whistler. Editions: 34 known impressions, 1 state In this self-portrait Whistler is shown with his characteristic white lock of hair, a genetic trait that he shared with his sister, the result of Waardenburg Syndrome. The white lock is apparent in photographs of the artist and was described by some of his contemporaries, such as the artist Anne Benson Procter (1799-1888), who wrote in a letter that Whistler was "a very remarkable looking person - dark - eyes & hair - and one white lock, on his forehead - all the family have this - He thinks very highly of his own works... I always imagine that a truly great genius is nev

Image of Art-2D Collection - 1962.20.33

Art-2D Collection - 1962.20.33

"The Unsafe Tenement," 1858, etching by James McNeill Whistler. Signed lower right: Whistler Image features a large, very dilapidated house. In the center, a young girl in a white dress is talking to a young boy inside. The Unsafe Tenement was drawn during Whistler's etching tour of the Rhineland between 14 August and 7 October 1858. It was published in Douze eaux-fortes d'après Nature (the 'French Set') in November 1858. Reference: Margaret F. MacDonald, Grischka Petri, Meg Hausberg, and Joanna Meacock, James McNeill Whistler: The Etchings, a catalogue raisonné, University of Glasgow, 2012, on-line website at http://etchings.arts.gla.ac.uk. Catalogue number G18. Exhibition label

Image of Art-2D Collection - 1962.20.34

Art-2D Collection - 1962.20.34

"The Adam and Eve, Old Chelsea," 1878, etching by James McNeill Whistler. Published London: Hogarth, 1878. Signed: butterfly (artist's symbol) Image of beached boats on the Chelsea riverbank of the Thames River at low tide. The "Adam and Eve," the nearest gabled building pictured, was a public house by the river that was eventually demolished to make way for the Chelsea Embankment. Reference: Margaret F. MacDonald, Grischka Petri, Meg Hausberg, and Joanna Meacock, James McNeill Whistler: The Etchings, a catalogue raisonné, University of Glasgow, 2012, on-line website at http://etchings.arts.gla.ac.uk. Catalogue number G182.