Creator Record

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Name Covens, Johannes
Life Dates 1697-1774
Nationality Dutch
Occupation Cartographer, Publisher
Notes With brother-in-law Cornelius Mortier, established the Dutch publishing firm of Covens and Mortier; firm was active from 1721 to mid-1800s.
Role Cartographer

Associated Records

Image of Map Collection - 2014.17.3

Map Collection - 2014.17.3

"Germano - Sarmatia in qua Populi maiores Venedi et Aestiaei Peucini et Bastarnae...," Amsterdam, 1725, hand-colored engraving, map by Johannes Covens and Cornelius Mortier, after Nicholas Sanson. From Covens and Mortier's Atlas Antiquus, a composite of maps delineating the ancient world. Based on Sanson's geography, this map depicts part of the Baltic Sea and the present day countries of Poland, Lithuania, Russia and Latvia. Germania was defined by Rome as having two regions: Lesser Germania west of the Rhine and Greater Germania east of the Rhine. This map depicts Greater Germania.

Image of Map Collection - 2014.17.19

Map Collection - 2014.17.19

"Pinax georgraphicus patriarchatus hiero solymitani," Amsterdam, c. 1725, hand-colored engraving, map by Johannes Covens and Cornelius Mortier, after Philippe de la Rue A map of the Holy Land, based on an original map by Philippe de la Rue (c. 1651), including Palestine and part of northern Egypt, showing Jerusalem, Mount Sinai, Petra, the Nile, the Black Sea, and other waterways and mountains.

Image of Map Collection - 2014.17.28

Map Collection - 2014.17.28

"Gouvernement General de L'Isle de France ou sont la France, le Valois, Soissonnois, le Beauvaisis, Laonnois, la Brie, Francoise l'Hurepoix noyonnois et les Comtes de Senlis et de Dreux avec une partie du Gastinois," Amsterdam, c. 1721-1740, hand-colored engraving, map by Frederick de Wit, Johannes Covens and Cornelius Mortier A map of the old province of France, the Isle de France, with Paris at its center, and encompassing the north-central territories of Val-d'Oise, Seine-et-Marne, Seine-Saint-Denis, Ville-de-Paris (Paris), Hauts-de-Seine, Val-de-Marne, Essonne, and Yvelines, based on the map by Nicholas Sanson published in 1651. Some parts of the historic province are now incorporated

Image of Map Collection - 2014.17.29

Map Collection - 2014.17.29

"Civitas Leucorum sive Pagus Tullensis aujourdhui le Diocese de Toul," Amsterdam, 1733, hand-colored engraving, map by Guillaume de l'Isle, John Covens and Cornelius Mortier A map of the ancient diocese of Toul, once a state of the Holy Roman Empire, and now the Lorraine region of France, extending from Verdun in the north and south to Besancon, showing the parishes colored individually.

Image of Map Collection - 2014.17.55

Map Collection - 2014.17.55

"Geographia Synodica sive Regionum Urbium et Locorum ubi Celebrata sunt Concilia," Amsterdam, 1730, hand-colored engraving, map by Guillaume Sanson, John Covens and Cornelius Mortier A map of Europe highlighting the places where Church councils and Synods have been held, and extending West to East from Spain to the Black Sea and South to North from Libya to Sweden. The title appears within an allegorical cartouche upper right, the vignette representing a church council in session with the Holy Spirit hovering above.

Image of Map Collection - 2014.17.63

Map Collection - 2014.17.63

"In Notitiam Ecclesiasticam Africae," Amsterdam, 1730, hand-colored engraving, map by Guillaume de l'Isle, published by Johannes Covens and Cornelius Mortier This map was created by Guillaume de l'Isle and included in Atlas Nouveau, contenant toutes les parties su Monde, a later edition of his maps published by Covens and Mortier in Amsterdam in 1730. It focuses on the regions controlled by the Moors in northern Africa and the Iberian Peninsula in the latter part of the medieval period, with detail along the North African coast from Morocco to Libya. It also covers the western Mediterranean with the islands of Sardinia, Corsica, Malta, and the Balearics. Sicily features an image of a smoki

Image of Map Collection - 2014.17.76

Map Collection - 2014.17.76

"Hispaniae Antiquae Tabula," Amsterdam, c. 1730, hand-colored engraving, map by Nicolas Sanson, Johannes Covens and Cornelius Mortier A map of "Ancient Spain," with Portugal and the Balearic Islands, by the French cartographer Nicolas Sanson d'Abbeville. The map includes the various place names of cities and small towns, rivers, and mountains, as well as engraved borders of the various Spanish provinces.

Image of Map Collection - 2014.17.80

Map Collection - 2014.17.80

"Galatia cujus Populi Tolistobogi, Tectosages, Trocmi, mox Provincia sub Romanis…," Amsterdam, c. 1700, hand-colored engraving, map by Nicolas Sanson, published by John Covens and Cornelius Mortier This map depicts northern Turkey, centered on Ankara. It illustrates the provinces inhabited by the three Celtic tribes (Tolistobogi, Tectosages, and Trocmi) that migrated from the Danube Valley to Galatia in the third century CE.

Image of Map Collection - 2014.17.81

Map Collection - 2014.17.81

"Pamphilia et Pisidia," Amsterdam, c. 1730, hand-colored engraving, map by Nicolas Sanson, published by Johannes Covens and Cornelius Mortier This rare map of southern Asia Minor (present-day Turkey) comprises the ancient provinces of Pamphilia and Pisidia (now modern Antalya Province), shown here as they were at the time of Emperor Trajan's death in 117 CE. The principal cities of the coastal province of Pamphilia were Perga and Attalia (modern Antalya), both of which were visited by the Apostle Paul. He also famously visited the city of Antioch in Pisidia, where he gave his first sermon to the Gentiles as recounted in Acts 13 in the Bible.

Image of Map Collection - 2014.21.38

Map Collection - 2014.21.38

Johannes Covens, Cornelius Mortier, and I. Condet Carte Generale du Marquisat de Moravie... Hand-colored engraving Amsterdam, ca. 1720 Map with colored elements by Johannes Covens, Cornelius Mortier, publishers, and I. Condet, engraver: Austria, Hungary, Poland, and surrounding regions. The regions, cities, towns, et cetera, are clearly identified on the map, larger settlements or significant Christian sites marked with red castle/cathedral icon, i.e. "Ratibor" top right of map. Some regions, some forests, some mountain ranges, some rivers, and some bodies of water, colored, some texture, some mountain ranges, some rivers, some forests, some roads, some bodies of water, and some fields,

Image of Map Collection - 2014.21.51

Map Collection - 2014.21.51

Johannes Covens and Cornelius Mortier after Guillaume de L'Isle In Notitiam Ecclesiasticam Africae Tabula Geographica Hand-colored engraving Amsterdam, 1725 Map with colored elements by Johannes Covens, cartographer, and Cornelius Mortier, cartographer, after Guillaume De l'Isle, cartographer: North Africa, including Tunisia and parts of Morocco, Algeria and Libya. The regions, cities, towns, et cetera, are clearly identified on the map, larger settlements marked with red castle/cathedral icon, i.e. "Thagulis", bottom right of map. Some regions, some mountain ranges, some roads, some rivers, some bodies of water, and some small islands, colored, some texture, some regions, some mountain

Image of Map Collection - 2014.21.52

Map Collection - 2014.21.52

Johannes Covens and Cornelius Mortier after Nicholas Sanson Antiquorum Africae Episcopatuum Geographica Descriptio Hand-colored engraving Amsterdam, 1725 Map with colored elements by Johannes Covens, cartographer, and Cornelius Mortier, cartographer, after Nicolas Sanson, cartographer: North Africa, including parts of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya, and Southern Spain, Italy, and Sicily. The regions, cities, towns, et cetera, are clearly identified on the map, larger settlements marked with red castle/cathedral icon, i.e. "Hispalis" top left of map. Some regions, some mountain ranges, some borders, some rivers, and small islands, colored, some texture, some regions, some mountain r